All Things Considered

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red-lipstick:

MenervaTau aka Menerva Tau - Somnium, 2011     Drawings: Pencils on Schoeller Paper
design-is-fine:

Galileo Galilei, Drawings of the Moon, 1609. Watercolour. Via Palazzo Strozzi
explore-everywhere:

specialopz:

0700, middle of nowhere, BLM land

Dan; always inspiring.
I don’t know what I expected, but it sure as hell wasn’t that.
pbstv:

Meet Lucy, a 3.2 million-year-old ancestor of ours. Though she looks like an ape, her knees were close together, just like a human’s! That positioned her feet directly under her body and made walking easier. 
See the final installment of Your Inner Fish tomorrow night (4/23) on PBS at 10/9c.

Louis Armstrong playing for his wife.

"I can’t think of anything but nights with you."

- Zelda Fitzgerald to Scott Fitzgerald, 1919 (via theskunkcatcher)

(Source: larmoyante, via fantasie-impromptu)

magicaldeductions:

goddammit bill

(via zafarooni)

afresherowtlook:

Trust.

(Source: wenchyfloozymoo, via kgrips)

travelingcolors:

Oh My Maps (by Marc Khachfe)

London-based artist Marc Khachfe fuses science, space, and art in his series of large-scale maps composed of multiple layers of photographs and data. ‘I was blown away by the nighttime images taken of cities at night by the astronauts on the ISS (international space station) and wanted to print out a large poster of the London one for my office, but I found them too blurry and too small to look good good printed out large format’, Khachfe explains. Sourcing open map data, Khachfe has composited the visual information with data and layered it with CGI, to mimic the glow of streets and buildings. finally, photoshop merges all the layers together and play with colors, exposure and glow augment the reality of each image. the artistic interpretations are geographically accurate and match the real images as closely as possible.

Maps (in order): London - Helsinki - Rio - Chicago - Cleveland - Amsterdam

(via kgrips)

"We have been left, first, with the idea that progress is neither natural nor embedded in the structure of history; that is to say, it is not nature’s business or history’s. It is our business. No one believes, or perhaps ever will again, that history itself is moving inexorably toward a golden age. The idea that we must make our own future, bend history to our own will, is, of course, frightening and captures the sense of Nietzsche’s ominous remark that God is dead. We have all become existentialists, which lays upon us responsibilities that once were shared by God and history."

- Neil Postman, Building a Bridge to the Eighteenth Century (via rchtctrstdntblg)

(Source: mbelt, via rchtctrstdntblg)

Patterns by William Morris, part III.

(Source: marieantoinete, via rchtctrstdntblg)